Recruitment Diary: Part One

Recruitment Diary: Part One

A crash course in recruitment:

My first couple of weeks as a junior recruiter were somewhat of a whirlwind. And by somewhat, I mean a complete whirlwind. Each day I learned something new, taking part in training exercises, seminars and getting hands on instruction from senior consultants and the directors themselves. I made it my mission to absorb as much as humanly possible and to rise to the challenge that was my intensive training programme.   

To be completely honest, before coming to work for Recruiters, I didn’t know the first thing about what a recruiter actually did. Like many employees trying to climb the career ladder, I was wary of them and ascribed to the general misconception that working with a recruiter meant sacrificing a big chunk of my salary.

It was a fluke that I even ended up a part of this team, a complete leap away from the career path I thought I’d decided on wholeheartedly.

This is my story: my first year in recruitment the highs, the lows and all the work that goes on in between.

Week one, day one

I climb the steps to the office only somewhat anxiously, having met my team the week before at their annual barbeque. All the small talk already out of the way and remembering who’s who, I’m ready to dive right in. Waiting at my desk is a massive binder full of notes and instructions and rules for my new job. I sit down and look around at the office and my new team, and allow myself to imagine becoming great at it.

There’s not time for much more than a quick fantasy of my future, because my new boss arrives with a smile on his face and a coffee in his hand, ushering me down to the boardroom for our weekly team meeting.

Over the course of the next hour I listen to the targets and projections of each of the consultants. It could have been intimidating, but instead I found it exhilarating. I realise quite quickly that it’ll probably take me awhile to have numbers to speak of as well, but I’m up for the challenge.

The rest of the day passes before my eyes; I’ve got a steady schedule of training seminars to attend and lessons to master the absolute basics of our systems. It’s a lot to take in, and my own nerves, each of my new colleagues takes the time to make sure I’m keeping up.

I can’t help but feel a bit exhausted, but I leave with my head held high nonetheless, excited to return to work the next day for the first time in a long time.